WordPress

WordPress

 

WordPress is a free and open source blogging tool and a content management system (CMS) based on PHP and MySQL. Features include a plugin architecture and a template system. WordPress was used by more than 22.0% of the top 10 million websites as of August 2013. WordPress is the most popular blogging system in use on the Web, at more than 60 million websites.

It was first released on May 27, 2003, by its founders, Matt Mullenweg and Mike Little, as a fork of b2/cafelog. The license under which WordPress software is released is the GPLv2 (or later) from the Free Software Foundation.

WordPress is the popular software that allows for the creation of blogs and it comes in two versions. The version of WordPress found on the .com site allows the user to set up a free, full featured blog that will satisfy the basic needs of many bloggers and that is slightly customizable at no charge, and then, still more customizable for some small fees. The .org version is meant to be loaded onto a hosting computer and is fully customizable although one will have to be familiar with the workings of software and capable of writing code to accomplish this.

It is currently the fastest growing CMS software. Initially, WordPress was largely associated with blogs as its main functionality was to allow easy blog experience. Yet, over time, its developers expanded its functionality to allow the creation of more complicated websites and grew it into a content management system rather than a blogging tool. WordPress is considered the easiest to use CMS thanks to a very friendly interface. It also has an amazing number of plugins which allow extension of its functionality in various possible ways.

Using WordPress allows you to manage a web site from any computer with an internet connection. The form-based interface of WordPress makes it easy to post content and create pages very quickly. With WordPress, you won’t need any additional software other than a browser.

Prior to version 3, WordPress supported one blog per installation, although multiple concurrent copies may be run from different directories if configured to use separate database tables. WordPress Multisites (previously referred to as WordPress Multi-User, WordPress MU, or WPMU) was a fork of WordPress created to allow multiple blogs to exist within one installation but is able to be administered by a centralized maintainer. WordPress MU makes it possible for those with websites to host their own blogging communities, as well as control and moderate all the blogs from a single dashboard. WordPress MS adds eight new data tables for each blog…

As of the release of WordPress 3, WordPress MU has merged with WordPress.